Online Hospitality Management Bachelor's Degree

What You'll Learn & What You Can Do After Graduation

Earning a hospitality management degree online sets up graduates for interesting, fast-paced roles in event planning and restaurant and hotel management. Meeting, convention, and event planners in 2017 earned a median salary of $48,290, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects positions in this field will grow by 11% between 2016 and 2026. Graduates with their bachelor's in hospitality possess specialized knowledge, which makes them stand out from the competition.

Why Earn an Online Degree in Hospitality Management?

Learners with busy schedules can benefit from the flexibility of distance learning, which allows them to juggle other life responsibilities while pursuing their education. Learners can work on their online hospitality management degrees from any location with a stable internet connection. Many programs offer asynchronous classes, through which students can complete their coursework at their own pace. This permits students to continue working or caring for their families while completing their hospitality program. Moreover, online programs tend to cost less than their on-campus counterparts, saving distance learners on transportation and housing expenses.

What Can I Do with an Online Hospitality Management Bachelor's Degree?

Accredited hospitality management online programs prepare students to work in several interesting sectors, spanning from food and wine management to wedding planning. Bachelor's-level hospitality skills allow graduates to pursue rewarding positions, and serve as a foundation for those planning to complete graduate-level programs.

Skills and Knowledge Gained

To succeed in the hospitality industry, professionals must possess the skills to meet clients' needs and keep up with the ever-changing landscape of their jobs. Top hospitality management online degrees help students build these skills so they can compete for roles after graduation. The best hospitality professionals can effectively manage a broad range of personalities and handle conflicts as they arise. They also possess strong interpersonal skills and an ability to split their time between overseeing staff and liaising with customers and clients.

Hospitality workers should demonstrate professionalism, as they often represent their restaurant, hotel, or event planning organization. Most of their responsibilities revolve around leadership and management. A strong business foundation also goes a long way in the hospitality industry, as managers often oversee budgets, payroll, scheduling, inventory management, and marketing and advertising.

Careers and Salary Potential

Individuals pursuing roles in hospitality management typically enjoy working with clients and anticipating their needs. They take satisfaction in solving problems, exceeding expectations, and curating experiences for customers to remember for a long time. Given the nature of the industry, hospitality professionals often work nontraditional hours. As they gain industry experience, leadership opportunities may open up for hospitality professionals.

  • Hotels: Hotel management positions require focused, multi-tasking individuals who can lead a team of front- and back-of-house staff in executing pleasant stays for guests. Hotel managers must be organized and quick-thinking, and always willing to go the extra mile.
  • Restaurants: Restaurants seek managers who can interface with customers to ensure their satisfaction, and also maintain the business side by creating and balancing budgets, scheduling staff, ordering supplies, and managing marketing and promotions.
  • Special Event Planning Services: Whether working as in-house event planners or freelancers, hospitality professionals must pay close attention to detail and devote themselves to ensuring each client enjoys their experience.
Lodging Manager

Annual Median Salary: $51,800

Whether working at a hotel or resort, lodging managers ensure guests enjoy their stay by inspecting the establishment for cleanliness, training guest services and housekeeping on standards, answering guests' questions, hiring qualified staff, and resolving issues as they arise. They also monitor budgets to make sure the business remains profitable.

Event Coordinator

Annual Median Salary: $40,462

Event coordinators plan conferences, meetings, parties, and other events to their clients' specifications. They oversee logistics, manage budgets, work with vendors to secure contracts, hire staff, oversee set-up and tear-down, and communicate with clients to understand and meet their needs.

Restaurant Manager

Annual Median Salary: $44,446

These specialists oversee the logistics, operations, and management of restaurants by hiring and training all staff, setting schedules, organizing meetings, handling customer complaints, managing reservations and special events, and ordering supplies as needed.

Public Relations or Fundraising Manager

Annual Median Salary: $111,280

These professionals work with nonprofits, businesses, and governmental agencies to manage public image. They act as spokespeople, cultivating relationships in the community, setting fundraising goals, identifying donors, planning fundraising events, training staff, and ensuring budgets stay balanced along the way.

Food Service Director

Annual Median Salary: $51,481

Rather than managing the customer experience as restaurant managers do, food service directors typically oversee the business side of things. They manage staff, set and monitor budgets, ensure menu items meet quality and safety standards, stay abreast of regulatory requirements, and manage inventory to make sure kitchen staff possess all the supplies they need.