Guide to Getting Your Online Associate Degree in Network Administration

Become Team
Become Team
December 15, 2021

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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), associate degree-holders earn an average of $938 per week, which is $157 more than workers with only a high school diploma. An associate degree can prove even more lucrative for students who pursue degrees in sought-after fields, such as network administration.

An online associate degree in network administration can lead to rewarding careers. Additionally, associate degree-holders can pursue a bachelor's degree in a related field, such as computer science or cybersecurity. This guide covers all you need to know about online associate degrees in network administration, including:

What Will You Learn in an Online Associate Degree in Network Administration Program?

While network administration degrees mainly focus on developing technical skills, these programs also build conceptual knowledge about the field.

Some schools offer administration programs as a concentration within an information technology degree, while others boast a standalone network administration degree. Below are some common courses within online network administration associate degree programs:

Common Courses

Network Security and Firewalls

Associate programs often include introductory classes on information security. In these courses, students explore common network vulnerabilities and the methods hackers use to infiltrate computer systems. Students also examine security measures, such as firewalls.

Introduction to Networking

In introductory networking courses, students explore fundamental data networking technologies, terminology, and skills. Students also learn about the fundamental technical concepts of computer networks and telecommunications. The course also covers the business applications of networking.

Unix/Linux Systems Administration

Aspiring systems administrators need a strong background in Unix and Windows operating systems. This course teaches students about the Unix/Linux operating system and system administration. Topics include Linux commands, networking, troubleshooting, security, and file systems.

Database Design and Implementation

Database courses prepare students for work as database administrators and managers. These classes cover system architecture, design theories, storage, and data models. Learners may also gain experience using Structured Query Language to retrieve data.

Fundamentals of Information Technology

Basic information technology classes examine the role of IT departments in businesses and organizations. Students may also learn about IT subfields, such as networking, security, and management. Learners study computer hardware, web development, and programming.

Core Skills

The top accredited network administration programs develop technical skills specific to network administration that students can apply to other careers. Associate in network administration programs position students to start working immediately upon graduation or go on to a bachelor's program.

Key skills you'll learn include:

What Can You Do With an Online Associate Degree in Network Administration?

Given their basic knowledge of information technology and security, graduates can land diverse IT positions. TheBLS projects about 667,600 new job opportunities for computer professionals through 2030.

Potential Careers and Salaries

Network and computer systems administrators install, manage, and repair computer systems in various organizations. Many employers require a bachelor's degree, but some accept a certificate or associate degree.

Average Annual Salary: $89,460

Computer support specialists may offer technical help to users or address an organization's IT problems. They sometimes need a bachelor's degree, but many hold an associate degree.

Average Annual Salary: $71,040

Web developers design, build, and administer websites. They meet with clients to determine a website's purpose and use programming languages to create a site's appearance and functionality.

Average Annual Salary: $85,490

Computer programmers use various coding languages, such as Java and HTML, to build applications and operating systems. They work in computer systems design, finance, and software publishing industries.

Average Annual Salary: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-programmers.htm#tab-1

Getting a Bachelor’s After Your Online Associate Degree in Network Administration

Network administration associate graduates can immediately start their careers or advance their technical skills and knowledge through a four-year degree.

While associate degree-holders can pursue entry-level positions, a bachelor's degree prepares graduates for high-level roles with more responsibility and pay.

Network administration graduates might consider earning bachelor's degrees in fields like computer science, information technology management, or the subjects listed below.

Bachelor's in Network Administration

These programs build on associate-level coursework and ready students for more advanced network and systems administration positions. Employers commonly require network administrators to hold a bachelor's degree.

Bachelor's Degree in Cybersecurity

A bachelor's degree in cybersecurity helps associate degree-holders advance as information security analysts who protect an organization's systems and information.

Bachelor's in Web Development

While an associate degree in network administration opens the door to entry-level web developer jobs, a bachelor's in the field enables graduates to secure more specialized positions, such as a backend developer role.

Become Team
Become Team
Contributing Writer

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