Careers to
Stamp Out Smoking

Professional Paths Encouraging a Tobacco-Free Lifestyle

Despite all of the evidence of the dangers to its users, smoking continues to be one of the most serious public health problems in the world. Read on to learn more about smoking’s health consequences, expert strategies on how to quit, and how pursuing a career in public health and other fields can help others live a healthy, smoke-free life.

Tobacco use killed 100 million people
in the 20th century
If current trends continue,
tobacco will kill
1 billion people in the 21st century

Source: World Health Organization: Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008


Health Careers to Make a Difference

For individuals who are passionate about helping people to quit smoking, pursuing a degree and career in public, mental or physical health is a logical way to go. The following is a description of academic specialties and related health professions that are most relevant to the issue of smoking.

Core Career Paths

Community Health

A popular specialization for public health degrees, Community Health (or Community Health Sciences) focuses on training students in the public health concepts of community-based research and/or programs. Graduates with this specialization are prepared to balance their practice between the competing needs and interests of research, administration, and policy development in regard to specific community health issues such as preventable diseases caused by tobacco use.

Health Educator

Health educators provide information and resources to individuals on the dangers of smoking and the benefits of quitting. Job duties may include preparing and giving lessons or presentations, planning curricula, designing and writing for media or public relations campaigns and working on smoking-related legislation. Jobs with this title generally require a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s may be required for more advanced educator positions.

Smoking Cessation Contractor

Smoking cessation contractors work with health care systems to improve the reach and delivery of tobacco dependence treatment to those who smoke or use other tobacco-based products. Contractors work with hospitals, community and federally qualified health centers, and mental and behavioral health service agencies, often serving low-education and low-income community members.

Health Behavior/
Health Behavior and Prevention

A major element to fighting smoking and nicotine addiction is facilitating behavioral changes in individuals and the community as a whole. Those public health graduates with a specialization in health behavior and prevention draw upon a number of elements such as teaching, the social and behavioral sciences, and communication to aid community members in overcoming negative behaviors and patterns and replacing them with behaviors that encourage better health and minimize disease.

Child Behavioral Health Specialist

Child behavioral health specialists work in hospitals, clinics and outpatient programs to assess and address emotional, behavioral and developmental problems and disorders common in children and adolescents. Specialists in the field also work with parents and other family members to educate and counsel them on the special needs of children to help prevent the development of addictive behaviors, such as smoking, before they start.

Mental Health Counselor

Mental health counselors work with individuals and groups to promote optimal mental and emotional health. This often includes helping patients, parents and other family members deal with issues involving addictions and substance abuse, a category that includes smoking and nicotine addiction.

Health Education and Promotion

Also popular in public health degree programs, the Health Education and Promotion specialization, particularly on the master’s degree level, primarily prepares students for administrative roles in addressing community health and wellness challenges in areas involving smoking and tobacco use such as disease and illness prevention, and nutrition and exercise.

Health Educator

Health educators provide information and resources to individuals on the dangers of smoking and the benefits of quitting. Job duties may include preparing and giving lessons or presentations, planning curricula, designing and writing for media or public relations campaigns and working on smoking-related legislation. Jobs with this title generally require a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s may be required for more advanced educator positions.

Health Education and Promotion Specialist

These PH professionals often work with governmental agencies in the administration of state-mandated programs, with non-profits in delivering health resources and programs to targeted populations, such as smokers, and in the private sector in positions with health insurers, and in consulting, worksite wellness and teaching.

Health Services Administrator

Health Services Administrators (also known as Health Services Managers or Health Managers) plan, direct and coordinate the operations of health facilities, such as hospitals and clinics, health care systems and other similar organizations. HSAs are responsible for all types of facility management functions including staff, budgets, community relations, programs and services, and others.

Epidemiology

Epidemiology is concerned with the incidence, development, distribution and control of disease in populations. Students interested in the effects of smoking can focus their research and clinical studies primarily on cancer as well as heart, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases caused by tobacco use.

Occupational Epidemiologist

Occupational epidemiology concerns the application of epidemiologic methods to populations of workers and the workplace itself, and the adverse affects of smoking in the workforce is one of the most substantial occupational health concerns for workers and employers everywhere. Students interested in this area of epidemiology are employed in all sectors of the economy including governmental agencies like OSHA and within large private businesses and industry.

Research Epidemiologist

Research epidemiologists conduct research and perform studies to determine how to control or wipe out disease, often in regard to specifically identifiable populations (such as smokers). These specialists commonly find employment with colleges and universities, medical and public health schools, and research and development firms.

Public Health Communication

Public Health Communication (or Health Communication) is a common specialization both in public health degree programs as well as communication degree programs. Students choosing this concentration will develop the knowledge and skills to effectively influence public health education and public relations strategies through interaction with program managers and administrators, medical staffs, nurses, doctors and patients.

Smoking Cessation Contractor

Smoking cessation contractors work with health care systems to improve the reach and delivery of tobacco dependence treatment to those who smoke or use other tobacco-based products. Contractors work with hospitals, community and federally qualified health centers, and mental and behavioral health service agencies, often serving low-education and low-income community members.

Health Communication Specialist

Health communications specialists are typically employed in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, psychiatric facilities, community health centers, and with smoking cessation clinics. Job tasks include organizing events between organizations and the public and writing and distributing press releases.

Global Health

Smoking is not just a problem the US, it is a significant health concern around the world, most urgently in undeveloped and developing countries. The Global Health specialization is a great choice for students interested in the subject of smoking and public health since curricula is often focused on health concerns among populations around the world. Smoking-related global health issues include the underlying socio-economic factors, detriments, and environmental exposures affecting diseases in populations.

Health Educator

Health educators provide information and resources to individuals on the dangers of smoking and the benefits of quitting. Job duties may include preparing and giving lessons or presentations, planning curricula, designing and writing for media or public relations campaigns and working on smoking-related legislation. Jobs with this title generally require a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s may be required for more advanced educator positions.

Research Epidemiologist

Research epidemiologists conduct research and perform studies to determine how to control or wipe out disease, often in regard to specifically identifiable populations (such as smokers). These specialists commonly find employment with colleges and universities, medical and public health schools, and research and development firms.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Social and Behavioral Sciences specialization is widely offered in public health degree programs, especially on the MPH level. This specialization is ideal for students interested in the issue of smoking as curricula is focused on identifying and analyzing social determinants and behavioral risk factors associated with public health problems. Emphasis is often placed on the analysis of psychological factors related to health and behavior.

Child Behavioral Health Specialist

Child behavioral health specialists work in hospitals, clinics and outpatient programs to assess and address emotional, behavioral and developmental problems and disorders common in children and adolescents. Specialists in the field also work with parents and other family members to educate and counsel them on the special needs of children to help prevent the development of addictive behaviors, such as smoking, before they start.

Smoking Cessation Contractor

Smoking cessation contractors work with health care systems to improve the reach and delivery of tobacco dependence treatment to those who smoke or use other tobacco-based products. Contractors work with hospitals, community and federally qualified health centers, and mental and behavioral health service agencies, often serving low-education and low-income community members.

Health Educator

Health educators provide information and resources to individuals on the dangers of smoking and the benefits of quitting. Job duties may include preparing and giving lessons or presentations, planning curricula, designing and writing for media or public relations campaigns and working on smoking-related legislation. Jobs with this title generally require a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s may be required for more advanced educator positions.

Smoking Cessation Contractor

Smoking cessation contractors work with health care systems to improve the reach and delivery of tobacco dependence treatment to those who smoke or use other tobacco-based products. Contractors work with hospitals, community and federally qualified health centers, and mental and behavioral health service agencies, often serving low-education and low-income community members.

Child Behavioral Health Specialist

Child behavioral health specialists work in hospitals, clinics and outpatient programs to assess and address emotional, behavioral and developmental problems and disorders common in children and adolescents. Specialists in the field also work with parents and other family members to educate and counsel them on the special needs of children to help prevent the development of addictive behaviors, such as smoking, before they start.

Mental Health Counselor

Mental health counselors work with individuals and groups to promote optimal mental and emotional health. This often includes helping patients, parents and other family members deal with issues involving addictions and substance abuse, a category that includes smoking and nicotine addiction.

Health Education and Promotion Specialist

These PH professionals often work with governmental agencies in the administration of state-mandated programs, with non-profits in delivering health resources and programs to targeted populations, such as smokers, and in the private sector in positions with health insurers, and in consulting, worksite wellness and teaching.

Health Services Administrator

Health Services Administrators (also known as Health Services Managers or Health Managers) plan, direct and coordinate the operations of health facilities, such as hospitals and clinics, health care systems and other similar organizations. HSAs are responsible for all types of facility management functions including staff, budgets, community relations, programs and services, and others.

Occupational Epidemiologist

Occupational epidemiology concerns the application of epidemiologic methods to populations of workers and the workplace itself, and the adverse affects of smoking in the workforce is one of the most substantial occupational health concerns for workers and employers everywhere. Students interested in this area of epidemiology are employed in all sectors of the economy including governmental agencies like OSHA and within large private businesses and industry.

Research Epidemiologist

Research epidemiologists conduct research and perform studies to determine how to control or wipe out disease, often in regard to specifically identifiable populations (such as smokers). These specialists commonly find employment with colleges and universities, medical and public health schools, and research and development firms.

Health Communication Specialist

Health communications specialists are typically employed in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, psychiatric facilities, community health centers, and with smoking cessation clinics. Job tasks include organizing events between organizations and the public and writing and distributing press releases.

“There’s a huge range of disciplines that are relevant in the world of public health. There’s the policy side, the research side, the implementation side. The FDA probably has 600 or 700 employees by now. The states have their own tobacco control programs. So there are a lot of routes in terms of public health academics.”

– Jonathan M. Samet

Alternate Career Paths

Nursing

Nurses can be involved in nearly every aspect of healthcare, so they are often the person a patient sees most. Educating patients on the harms of smoking, providing them with advice and resources and supporting them as they work to fight their nicotine addiction are ways nurses can help their patients quit smoking. Learn more about nursing programs and careers >>

Dentistry

Persistent smoking can lead to gum disease and a host of other oral health problems. By educating patients on the harmful effects of smoking, providing informative literature, and performing both routine and specialized procedures, dental professionals can help in the fight against smoking.

Counseling

Services provided by psychiatrists and counselors can make it easier to quit smoking. These professionals meet with patients regularly and assess their addictive behaviors. They create individualized cessation plans with patients; help them discover, understand and overcome the roots of their addiction; and provide support throughout the quitting process.

Health Career Salaries, 2015

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2015

Health Risks Associated with Smoking

Despite being preventable, smoking kills more Americans each year than alcohol use, illegal drug use, motor vehicle injuries, firearm-related incidents, and HIV combined, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association. The following is a discussion of the most common and significant health risks associated with smoking.

Lung cancer

It is almost impossible for any single person in America to have not been personally effected by the death of a friend or loved one from lung cancer resulting from cigarette smoking. Lung cancer, simply put, is cancer that originates in the lungs. Not all cancers that appear in the lungs are lung cancers, however. Those that spread there from other locations (such as breast, pancreas, kidney, skin) are not considered lung cancers.

There are several types of lung cancers, the two most common being small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The most prevalent type is NSCLC, which accounts for 85 to 90 percent of lung cancers. There are three subtypes of NSCLC. The subtypes differ in terms of size, shape, and chemical make-up, but are grouped together because of similarities in course of treatment and prognosis. The main cause of both SCLC and NSCLC is believed to be smoking. It is estimated that smoking contributes to 80 and 90 percent of lung cancer deaths in men and women, respectively.

Estimate Attributable Portion of Lung Cancer Cases by Cause

Source: Lung Cancer Fact Sheet – American Lung Association

Other cancers

Lung cancer is not the only type of cancer that is associated with smoking. Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in the body, including:

  • Bladder
  • Blood (acute myeloid leukemia)
  • Cervix
  • Colon and rectum (colorectal)
  • Esophagus
  • Kidney and ureter
  • Larynx
  • Liver
  • Oropharynx
  • Pancreas
  • Stomach
  • Trachea, bronchus and lung
Heart disease and cardiovascular disease
Heart disease Generally refers to conditions that effect the heart, including blood vessel diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems, and congenital heart defects
Cardiovascular disease Refers to conditions such as those involving narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to heart attack, chest pain, or stroke

There is a great deal of subject crossover between the two terms and they are often used interchangeably. So, how does smoking negatively affect a person’s cardiovascular system?

Effects of smoking on an individual’s cardiovascular system

Breathing in cigarette smoke alters blood chemistry, causing damage to blood vessels, making them thicker and narrower and, in turn, increase heart rate and blood pressure.

Smoking also causes blood itself to thicken and become stickier, which can lead to blood clots that block blood flow to the heart, brain, and legs.

Changes in the blood due to smoking can result in lower “good cholesterol” and higher triglyceride levels.

The chemicals in tobacco smoke can prevent the repairing of damages to the lining of the arteries where blood clots are more likely to form. All of this leads to narrowed arteries due to plaque. Plaque buildup can cause chest pain, weakness, heart attack, and stroke. And total artery blockage due to plaque can cause sudden death.

Other cardiovascular problems resulting from smoking include reduced blood flow to legs and skin, causing tissue to die and the development of ulcers. Continued damage may result in amputation of toes, feet, and legs.

Respiratory disease

The respiratory system consists of the organs in the body involved with breathing including the lungs, bronchi, trachea, larynx, nose, and throat. Respiratory disease, therefore, concerns any diseases that affect the respiratory system; the most significant among them being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer.

COPD is described by the Mayo Clinic as “… a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes obstructed airflow from the lungs,” with symptoms such as breathing difficulty, cough, sputum production and wheezing. Forms of COPD include emphysema, where the air sacs of the lungs become damaged and chronic bronchitis, in which airways swell and can fill with mucus. Between 89 to 90 percent of all COPD cases are caused by smoking. COPD, however, is treatable and most sufferers can achieve good symptom control and reduce the risk of developing other related conditions with proper management.

In addition to COPD, smoking can exacerbate other respiratory conditions, including asthma.

“Nicotine in and of itself is not very harmful, but in certain situations it is more harmful. Nicotine for a pregnant woman, for example, can cause serious effects on the unborn child. Now it’s no big surprise that long-term nicotine use may have some negative impact. But for the regular user, an adult man, for example, when you think of the big diseases that kill people due to cigarette smoking — you’ve got lung cancer, nicotine doesn’t cause lung cancer. You’ve got COPD and lung diseases, nicotine doesn’t cause these.”

– Jonathan Foulds

Risks of Secondhand Smoke

Smoking is obviously dangerous for smokers, but how about those non-smokers around them? We’ve all heard the term “secondhand smoke,” but what exactly does it mean and how hazardous is it, really?

The CDC describes secondhand smoke as “… the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke breathed out by smokers.” Secondhand smoke is a major health problem, containing over 7,000 chemical compounds, more than 250 of which are known to be harmful and 69 known to cause cancer. Among those diseases are:

  • Lung cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Heart disease
  • Asthma
  • Lower respiratory tract infections
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

Governments, corporations, and others have become acutely aware of the public health issues surrounding secondhand smoke and are fighting back, imposing laws, regulations, and worksite rules segregating smoking to specific isolated, outdoor areas.

Teens and Smoking

According to the U.S. Surgeon General’s 2012 report, nearly 90 percent of smokers started smoking by the age of 18, which is why stopping kids from smoking before they start is so important. Cigarettes, however, are shockingly easy for teens to get. In fact, despite laws prohibiting cigarette sales to minors, more than 18 percent of smokers 18 years of age or younger had directly purchased cigarettes from stores or gas stations, according to the CDC. Other sources include older kids, vending machines, stealing, and sometimes even adults and parents.

The dangers of smoking know no age and the negative health consequences of teen smoking begin almost immediately. According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, some immediate consequences include:

  • Shortness of breath and decreased physical fitness in both performance and endurance
  • Reduced lung function and slowed growth of lung function
  • Faster resting heart rate and early signs of heart disease and stroke
  • Hearing loss, vision problems, and increased headaches
  • Chronic coughing, increased phlegm, emphysema and bronchitis

There are a number of actions parents and others can take, however, to help stop kids from smoking.

How to Help Prevent Teen Smoking

Start discussing the negative effects of smoking early.

The American Lung Association recommends starting as early as when a child is five or six years old. Explain the health risks, but also point out the easy to understand consequences, such unpleasant physical effects like bad breath and discolored teeth and fingernails.

Lead by example

Parents can make home a tobacco-free zone for their kids and others. And the best example a parent can set if he/she smokes themselves is quit.

Provide support in quitting if a teen is already smoking

If a child has already developed a smoking habit, don’t expect him or her to quit on their own simply because a parent tells them to. Nicotine is an addictive drug and a child will need help and support to break his or her addiction, just like any adult would.

E-Cigarettes

“The e-cigarette phenomenon that has caught on in the US in the last three or four years and moved very quickly.”

– Jonathan M. Samet

There has been a lot of attention paid to e-cigarettes over the last few years with many people wondering if they are a safer alternative to tobacco cigarettes. Others may wonder if they could be used to quit smoking entirely. The answer to both questions is the same: It is simply too early to tell.

E-cigarettes, also called electronic cigarettes or vapor cigarettes, are battery-operated devices designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They contain no tobacco, however, and instead employ cartridges filled with nicotine and other chemicals. When in use, the chemicals in the cartridge are vaporized and the vapor is inhaled by the user.

Although e-cigarettes have become extremely popular, they are still relatively new to the consumer market and, therefore, little is known regarding their long-term benefits and dangers, or their potential to mitigate the health problems caused by combustible cigarette use.

high school students

E-cigarette use (use on at least 1 day in the past 30 days) among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014, rising from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students.

MIDDLE school students

Among middle school students, current e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014, an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students.

Source: CDC Newsroom: E-cigarette use triples among middle and high school students in just one year.

Scholarships Addressing the Smoking Problem

AFDO
AFDO Scholarship Awards

The Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) sponsors two annual scholarship awards of $1,500 each. Recipients should have a demonstrated desire to serve in a career of research, research, regulatory work, quality control, or teaching in an area related to some aspect of foods, drugs or consumer product safety.

cbcf
CBCF General Mills Health Scholarship

Sponsored by General Mills and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, this program offers $2,500 scholarships to up to 46 recipients annually. Eligibility is open tofinancial-need students who live in a Congressional Black Caucus district and who plan to continue their education in a health-related field. Scholarships are offered each year for full-time study at an accredited institution of the student’s choice.

legacy
Dr. Alma S. Adams Scholarships

Sponsored by the American Legacy Foundation, the Dr. Alma S. Adams Scholarships awards two $5000 competitive scholarships annually to students who demonstrate a”record of commitment to community service on behalf of an underserved community, related to tobacco prevention and/or control, and the best use of the visual arts, media, creative writing or other creative endeavor to convey culturally appropriate health messages aimed at raising awareness of tobacco’s harmful impact.” Available for both undergraduate and graduate studies.

ethel
Dr. Ethel E. Johnson Memorial Scholarship

This program awards one $500 scholarship annually to a student currently in or entering his or her last year in an accredited respiratory program. Candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for serving those afflicted with lung disease, as well as a commitment to the Respiratory care profession. Documentation of community service, preferably with a healthcare related organization, is also required.

ala
Saidie Orr Dunbar Nursing Education Fund

Offered by the Oregon Federation of Women’s Clubs and the American Lung Association of Oregon, this program awards scholarships to nursing students who intend to practice in Oregon after graduation. Preference given to candidates interested in public health nursing. Awards average from $1,000 to $3,000.

quitday
QuitDay.org Scholarships

Three scholarships ($2,000, $700 and $300 each) are awarded annually for undergraduate study to students who submit the best essays on their vision of a smoke-free world.

uw
UW Tobacco Scholars Program

This scholarship program for University of Washington students offers two awards annually: the Tobacco Studies Fellowship ($1,000) and the Tobacco Studies Career Development Award ($500). Graduate students pursuing a master’s (first or second year) in any UW program are eligible to apply. UW doctoral students may apply for the career development stipends only.

After Graduation: Potential Employers

Once the hard work of earning a degree is over, the real world beckons, and that means finding a job. Below is a small sample of potential employers who often hire public health graduates interested in issues involving smoking and tobacco use:

Private Sector

cvs
CVS Pharmacy

CVS Pharmacy has taken the lead among the major pharmacy chains in the fight against smoking by eliminating the sale of tobacco products and providing smoking cessation programs to its customers. Employment for these programs is available.

ge
General Electric

Businesses big and small are becoming more informed about the costs in lower worker productivity and higher health care premiums associated with employees who smoke, and many are doing something about it. One of the largest is General Electric. GE has led the way among major corporations in establishing programs and incentives to help its employees quit the habit. The most successful of these programs continue to present making GE a great potential employer for interested public health graduates.

gsk
GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is a large, multinational pharmaceutical company based in the United Kingdom. It is also the manufacturer of NicoDerm, a popular line of nicotine replacement products.

johnson
Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson is another major corporation that has taken an active role in helping their employees quit smoking for good. As part of their comprehensive wellness and prevention program, J&J offers support to employees and their families through workplace tobacco cessation initiatives and programs.

pfizer
Pfizer

Another major pharmaceutical company, Pfizer is an American company based in New York City. Pfizer is the producer and manufacturer of Chantix, a well established medication used in the treatment of nicotine addiction.

Public Sector

cdph
California Tobacco Control Program

The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) is a State of California agency whose mission is toimprove the health of all Californians by reducing illness and premature death attributable to the use of tobacco products. Similar agencies in other states are also possible employers of public health graduates.

cdc
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a federal government agency under the Department of Health and Human Services. Its mission is to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the United States. The CDC’s main offices are located in DeKalb County, Georgia, but employment positions can be found throughout the country as well as overseas.

fda
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the federal government agency primarily responsible for the protection and promotion of public health in the nation through the regulation of drugs, food safety, vaccines and other products, including tobacco products. Employment opportunities can be found throughout the agency and its divisions such as its Center for Tobacco Products (CTP).

nih
National Institutes of Health

Also a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is made up of 27 Institutions and Centers each with its own specific research agenda, including the National Cancer Institute, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Environmental Health Services.

usphs
U.S. Public Health Service

Still another agency under the Department of Health and Human Services, the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service is the home to the Surgeon General. The stated mission of the Corp is to, “… protect, promote and advance the health and safety of our Nation.” There are currently more than 6,500 Commissioned Corp officers serving in a wide range of specialties with other Federal Agencies such as the NIH and the CDC.

Non-Profits

campaign
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids describes itself as a leading force in the fight to reduce tobacco use in the U.S. and around the world. Jobs can be found in Washington, D.C. and at global posts in countries like India and Bangladesh.

cdc
CDC Foundation

The CDC Foundation is a non-profit established by Congress whose function is to connect the Centers for Disease Control with private-sector organizations and individuals to build public health programs that extend the CDC’s life-saving work.

union
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease

Known as “The Union” for short, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease conducts research, provides training and offers technical assistance in creating health solutions in over 150 countries. The Union plays an active role in the Bloomberg Initiative to Reduce Tobacco Use, implementing tobacco control interventions in countries with the highest levels of tobacco-related disease.

who
World Health Organization (WHO)

The mission of the WHO is to direct and coordinate international health within the United Nations’ system. The WHO currently employs over 7000 workers in 150 country offices and at its headquarters in Geneva.

wlf
World Lung Foundation

The World Lung Foundation’s stated mission is to, “… improve the lives of individuals across the world by strengthening community capacity to prevent and manage lung disease.” Staff positions with the WLF can be found in its New York City headquarters and in cities around the world such as Beijing, Cairo, Delhi and Melbourne.

Anti-Smoking Resources

More Information

legacy
American Legacy Foundation

The American Legacy Foundation the largest non-profit public health organization in the United States dedicated specifically to tobacco control. Their website provides a wealth of information on a number of tobacco-related issues such as youth and young adult tobacco use, federal regulation, smoking cessation, and governments and the environment.

bp
Bloomberg Philanthropies: The Bloomberg Initiative to Reduce Tobacco Use

Working with several major partners including the World Health Organization and the American Cancer Society, the Bloomberg Initiative’s aim is to reduce the global demand for tobacco through a combination of policy change and public awareness.

cdc
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Often cited in this guide and for good reason. The CDC is one of the major government agencies for information and studies on the causes and effects of disease, including those associated with smoking.

mp
MedlinePlus

A great government resource on all forms of smoking including cigarettes, cigars, pipes. The site also provides an extensive list of news, statistics, journal articles, videos, health check tools and more.

nih
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

The other major federal government player providing extensive information and studies on diseases and health issues in the United States. The NIH website offers a wealth of facts, figures and news on smoking and the diseases and other health issues concerning it.

Getting Involved & Donations

ash
Action on Smoking & Health

Action on Smoking & Health is a non-profit organization dedicated to, “end the worldwide disease, damage and death caused by tobacco.”

dr
American Red Cross

The American Red Cross is a non-profit humanitarian organization devoted to providing emergency assistance, disaster relief and education within the United States. It is the nation’s affiliate of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

ala
American Lung Association: Donations

Online tool for making donations to the American Lung Association. Donations can be made in honor or in memorial to others.

anr
Americans for Non-Smokers’ Rights

Americans for Non-Smokers’ Rights is a non-profit organization that encourages citizens to take action in defense of the “right to breathe smokefree air.”

smokefree
Foundation for a Smokefree America

The Foundation’s stated mission is to,”… motivate youth to stay tobaccofree, and to empower smokers to quit. Donations can be made in memory of family members or others.